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TSP

TSP Proposes New Shutdown Loan Rules, OPM Considers Health Care Portal, and More

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Officials with the agency that administers the federal government’s 401(k)-style retirement savings program published an interim rule Tuesday that would ensure federal employees impacted by a government shutdown can take out loans on their Thrift Savings Plan accounts regardless of how long the lapse in appropriations is expected to last.

Posted in the Federal Register by the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board, which governs the TSP, the rule narrowly applies to federal workers who are either furloughed or forced to work without pay during a lapse in appropriations. Before this week, any employee in a “non-pay status” was eligible to take out a loan, so long as that status was expected to last less than 30 days.

As a result, there was uncertainty regarding whether employees at unfunded agencies could apply for TSP loans during the 35-day partial government shutdown, especially as it stretched into the third and fourth week. Earlier this month, TSP officials reported that they saw a 5 percent increase in the issuance of TSP loans during the lapse in appropriations, compared to a 26 percent increase in withdrawals, a more onerous process that forces participants to incur a 10 percent tax penalty and stop contributing to their accounts for six months.

In the rule filing, officials said they took great pains in order to come up with a way to implement the rule immediately.

“This interim rule applies only to participants who are furloughed or excepted from furlough (i.e., continuing to work and earn pay, but their pay is delayed until appropriations are authorized) due to a government shutdown,” the rule stated. “The FRTIB’s staff and contractors have designed manual workarounds to highly automated business processes in order to make this interim rule effective immediately so these participants will have access [to] TSP loans in the event of another government shutdown.”

Additionally, the rule allows TSP participants to request a suspension of their loan payments in the event of a shutdown to avoid the potential that they could default. And the agency is reexamining how it handles TSP loan applications from federal employees in other forms of non-pay status.

“Participants who are not receiving pay for other reasons (e.g., administrative furlough, voluntary leave of absence, seasonal work, sabbatical, disciplinary suspension) remain ineligible to request a loan,” the rule stated. “The FRTIB is considering whether to allow these participants to request loans in non-pay status and will address this subject in the final rule.”

Meanwhile, the Office of Personnel Management is thinking about a new way to help federal workers decide which insurance plan to enroll in as part of the Federal Employees Health Benefits Program. Meritalk reported Monday that the agency has issued a Request for Information seeking vendors to develop a “one-stop shop” portal for employees to compare and then enroll in health care plans.

Although OPM currently offers the ability to compare different FEHB plans on its website, the enrollment process and other customer service functions are largely decentralized across a multitude of agencies’ HR departments.

Among the functions OPM hopes to include in the portal are enrollment and decision-making support, enrollment processing, as well as enrollment and premium reconciliation and data collection and reporting. Responses to the request are due March 11.

On Tuesday, OPM announced that it is extending the deadline for the Combined Federal Campaign, the federal government’s annual charity giving effort, until Feb. 22.

The campaign was disrupted by the partial government shutdown, as donations are primarily made by way of payroll deductions. As a result, many payroll offices at unfunded agencies were not open to receive or process CFC pledges. Additionally, federal workers impacted by the shutdown would have been unlikely to make charity donations without knowing when they would next receive a pay check.

Although the deadline for making donations through the campaign was delayed, OPM said in a press release that money still will begin being disbursed to charities on April 1 as originally scheduled.

We also have other alternatives to where you don’t need to take a loan from your TSP to consider. Going six months without contributions is a tough penalty. Learn more by contacting us soon.

Plan to Pay Excepted Feds Immediately Gains Momentum

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With just days remaining until federal employees at unfunded agencies miss their second straight pay check, an idea to compensate at least some of them promptly appears to be gaining traction on Capitol Hill.

Two weeks ago, Sens. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., and Susan Collins, R-Maine, introduced the Shutdown Fairness Act (S. 113), which would make sure federal workers at unfunded agencies who are currently working without pay will get their pay checks on time, instead of after the government reopens. The measure would not compensate furloughed employees, although last week President Trump signed legislation to provide them with back pay after agencies reopen.

“All employees required to work during the shutdown to perform national security and other critical functions should receive paychecks on a current basis,” Collins said in a statement. “It is not fair to force employees to work and not pay them. Hundreds of thousands of federal employees and their families are being harmed by the partial government shutdown, and I am continuing to work with my colleagues and the White House to bring it to an end as quickly as possible.”

Jan. 18 marked the end of the second full pay period of the government shutdown. If Congress cannot reach an agreement on how to fund the government this week, roughly 800,000 employees, of which at least 420,000 are working without pay, will miss their second straight pay check.

Although the bill was introduced with four other Republican cosponsors, that tally had grown to 20 by Tuesday. And although he is not yet an official sponsor, Sen. Mark Warner, D-Va., threw his support behind the idea in multiple news interviews.

“The fact is, since we have already agreed to pay them when we reopen, why shouldn’t we at least go ahead and, even if we are shut down, pay these federal workers come Thursday, so they don’t have to incur additional pain and suffering?” Warner said Friday.

Warner repeated that sentiment on “Meet the Press” on Sunday. And on Tuesday, Warner introduced the Stop Shutdowns Transferring Unnecessary Pain and Inflicting Damage in the Coming Years Act, an effort to prevent future government shutdowns, similar to legislation introduced by Sen. James Lankford, R-Okla., and others last week.

Lankford’s bill would institute an automatic continuing resolution at existing spending levels in the event that Congress fails to approve an appropriations package, although the approved spending would decrease by 1 percent after 90 days, and an extra 1 percent for each 30 days thereafter. But Warner’s bill would maintain existing spending levels for all unfunded agencies, and end appropriations for Congress, its associated agencies and offices, and for the Executive Office of the President.

“The Stop STUPIDITY Act takes the aggressive but necessary step of forcing the president and Congress to do the jobs they were elected to do,” Warner said in a statement. “It is disturbing that the daily lives of hundreds of thousands of workers are at the mercy of dysfunction in Washington.”

Why Retirement Processing Takes So Long

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The busiest time of the year for retirement claims processing at the Office of Personnel Management is fast approaching. At the end of November, OPM had an inventory of 19,162 unprocessed retirement applications. This will most likely significantly increase over the next few months, because many federal employees plan their retirements at the end of the year in order to maximize their lump sum payout of unused annual leave.

The spike in end-of-leave-year retirements presents a number of challenges for retirement processing. According to a recent OPM inspector general report, the timely processing of initial retirement payments remains a challenge for the agency. OPM’s 2018-2022 strategic plan sets a target of achieving an average case processing time of 60 days or less. The agency’s Retirement Services unit appears to have met that goal in fiscal 2018, with an average of 59 days. But its claims backlog as of September was 17,628, more than 4.5 percent higher than at the same time a year ago.

According to the IG report, the steps Retirement Services is taking to address delays in processing include:

  • Continue to integrate improvements for correspondence and claims processing.
  • Enhance reporting tools to monitor and address Retirement Services workloads.
  • Use overtime to assist with timely processing.
  • Work with the agency’s chief information officer to explore new uses of technology to help improve processing and reduce wait times.
  • Provide monthly feedback to agencies and payroll offices and alert them of trends and improvement opportunities.
  • Identify training needs for agencies and conduct workshops on the retirement application process.

Once your retirement application is in the hands of OPM, there’s not much you can do but wait. But there are steps you can take beforehand to help ensure the process runs as smoothly as possible:

  • Double-check your application to make sure you’ve answered all of the questions on it. Complete your application electronically, if possible. OPM will not accept corrections in certain sections of the application form.  We will assist or completely fill this paperwork out and mail or email it to you.
  • Keep a copy of your completed application.
  • Be sure to complete the Marital Information and Annuity Election sections of the application. That applies whether you’re married, single, widowed or divorced. If you’re married, be sure to include a copy of your marriage certificate with your  application. If you’re divorced, you only need to include a copy of your court order or divorce decree if there was a portion of your retirement or survivor annuity awarded to your former spouse.
  • If you’re married and your spouse is waiving their right to the maximum spousal survivor annuity, be sure to have their signature notarized on the Spouse’s Consent to Survivor Election portion of the application.
  • If you’ve performed active duty military service, be sure you’ve included the documentation of your service and information related to military retired pay in Schedules A and B of the application.
  • Be sure to document that you’ve had five years of coverage under Federal Employees Health Benefits Program, especially if you were covered under your spouse’s FEHBP plan or you’re using coverage under TRICARE within five years of your retirement. According to an OPM training video, 20 percent of all retirement errors involve not documenting five years of FEHBP coverage.

For those of you who will be retiring from federal service in the next few weeks, let us be among the first to congratulate you and wish you a wonderful and rewarding life after government.

If you need any assistance on reviewing prior to separating, we do complete Federal Retirement Reviews, all the way from planning and preparing for your retirement, filling out retirement form packages, TSP rollovers, Pension Maximization, talk FEHP vs Medicare.  Contact Us to request your Retirement Review and Assistance today. 

How To Deal With Market Volatility with TSP When Close to Retirement

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This season’s market volatility can give any investor vertigo. But for those looking to retire in the next three to five years, the fluctuations are even more unsettling. CPA, author and retirement expert Ed Slott has some advice about what investors should be doing to protect themselves in these tumultuous times.

“As you get closer to retirement, income is more important than savings because savings — especially if they’re in the market — are not guaranteed, and savings can run out,” Slott tells Yahoo Finance.

“Short-term money has to be more secure. If you need the money on Thursday, you shouldn’t be in the market,” he says. “But if you need it in five or 10 years, then you can ride out a market correction like this.”

For investors close to retirement who do have money in the market, Slott urges caution. Overreacting to a declining market can put investors into situation known as a sequence-of-returns risk.

“If you’re pulling out money while the market is declining, you need to make a lot more money just to get back to even at double the rate and double the risk,” he says. “You can’t have dramatic reactions to something. It’s too much of a shock to the system,” Slott adds.

The best way for soon-to-be retirees to approach market volatility is with older conventional wisdom and walk away as soon as things have bounced back — even if it feels wrong to do so.

“When the market comes back, nobody wants to pull money out because it’s riding high,” Slott says. “That’s the time you might want to lock in some of those gains and pull it off the table and put it into a guaranteed income source,” such as annuities.

Last-minute retirement tips for the rest of 2018

With the year quickly winding down, there are still a few moves you can make to maximize your savings. Chief among them, according to Slott, is a Roth conversion, the process of moving money out of a conventional IRA into a Roth IRA and paying taxes now on the amount you convert.

“The last thing you want to think about is a tax maneuver while the market is declining, but there are three things happening now that make Roth conversions at year-end very favorable,” Slott says. “Number one, the market is declining so the values are lower. Tax rates are lower after the new tax law — they’re lower for most people — and you’re at the end of the year,” so you have a clear picture of your income and tax bracket.

“The benefit of paying tax now is that once it’s in a Roth IRA, it’s tax-free forever,” he says. You pay tax on today’s value, but if values are down, now is the time to strike. It’s like buying the taxes on sale.”

One key to keep in mind is that Roth conversions are not the same as IRA contributions — and they each have their own deadlines. While you have until April to make 2018 contributions to an IRA, Roth conversions for 2018 have to be completed in 2018 — meaning by Dec. 31.

Additionally, recent changes to the law have made Roth conversions permanent, so you have to be sure you want to move the money over since there are no do-overs.

To learn more on ways to safeguard your TSP account and for your free Fedeal Retirement Review to help you maximize all of your benefits, please contact us today. 

Some Secrets To A Financially Secure Retirement

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What is the best way to ensure a comfortable and enjoyable retirement? This week, I thought I’d share some observations I’ve made over the years about employees who end up with the same (and sometimes even greater) income during their retirement years than while they were employed.

These folks have been planning for retirement throughout the beginning, middle and pre-retirement stages of the federal careers. I sometimes meet employees who tell me they remember me from a retirement planning class they attended 20 years ago.

For those covered under the Federal Employees Retirement System, the Thrift Savings Plan has played an important role. These people have learned how to invest for the long term and what it means to diversify their investments among the G, C, F, S, and I Funds—or used the L Funds to automatically shift their investments as their careers progress. They have learned to tolerate a certain level of risk in order to obtain maximum results by not reacting emotionally to swings in market conditions.

FERS employees who have successfully leveraged their TSP accounts tend to have several things in common:

  • Those in higher income brackets are saving the maximum in their TSP accounts. The maximum employee contribution for 2019 is $19,000 plus an additional $6,000 in catch-up contributions if you’re turning 50 or are already older than 50.
  • Those in lower income brackets are living with little or no consumer debt and have saved a minimum of 5 percent of their salary in the TSP.
  • In general, they haven’t borrowed from their TSP account—or if they have, they didn’t stop contributing while repaying their loan balance.

The TSP was designed to be an integral part of FERS, but many employees under the Civil Service Retirement System also have taken advantage of participating in the plan and putting away savings on a pre-tax basis. They now have a significant nest egg for retirement.

Successful planners who are married have considered the “what-if” situations about the future. For example:

  • They weigh the value and cost of the spousal survivor benefit election. This causes a reduction in your CSRS or FERS retirement of about 10 percent, but it can mean the difference between financial security and uncertainty for a surviving spouse.
  • They consider that a delay in claiming Social Security may be more important to a future surviving spouse than to a couple’s short-term need for income. You may have other options than taking Social Security as soon as you can: delaying retirement, taking larger TSP distributions while waiting to claim Social Security, or embarking on a second career for a few years after your retirement from government. The difference between claiming at age 62 and waiting until age 70 is a benefit that is about 75 percent larger for the rest of your life and possibly later to the life of your surviving spouse.
  • They’re wary of using life insurance as a substitute for a survivor benefit. Life insurance is very expensive to continue as a substitute for a survivor’s annuity. Life insurance also doesn’t carry a cost of living adjustment or a guaranteed lifetime payment stream. And life insurance is not protected under the spouse equity provisions of the law, so it can be canceled without spousal consent.

Single people who have successfully planned for retirement have considered the amount of income they will need for a retirement that could potentially last longer than their career. This means both adequate retirement savings and thinking about such considerations as the potential need for long-term care.

If you’re a single woman, you may have a longer life expectancy than your male counterparts, and you also may have had lower lifetime earnings. This could translate into a need to save diligently for retirement and become a savvy investor. You need to put yourself first to ensure your financial independence before helping others.

Those who have successfully managed the retirement preparation process have another thing in common: They’re realistic. They, may, for example, limit the financial assistance they provide to their children in retirement to protect their savings. And some of them find that working a little longer than they anticipated eases the future financial strain. Sometimes following the path to a comfortable retirement involves some hard choices.

Which ever category you may fall in, its always best to ask a Federal Benefits Consultant how you are doing and let us help guide you to make sure you are maximizing all of your resources properly. Request your Free Consultation today. 

TSP Finally Unveils Plans for Expanding TSP Withdrawal Options

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The Thrift Savings Plan has until November to implement the 2017 TSP Modernization Act. That law will allow federal employees and retirees to make multiple age-based withdrawals from their TSP accounts and remain eligible for partial withdrawals after they leave government. Additionally, those who have left government would be able to make multiple partial post-separation withdrawals, and retirees will be able to change the amount and frequency of their annuity at any time, instead of only once per year.

Tanner Nohe, a project manager for the TSP, said the agency plans to have the law fully implemented by mid-September 2019. The project has caused officials to go beyond simply adding the functionality needed to implement the new law and instead “make some fundamental changes” to how withdrawals work, he said.

Under the new system, participants will no longer be forced to make a full withdrawal election—a choice between setting up annuity payments, taking a partial lump sum withdrawal, or a full lump sum payment—when they reach 70 and a half years old. That change will be retroactive, officials said.

“People on installment payments now, and [next year] they can come back and say, ‘I want to stop taking installments for a while,’” said Tee Ramos, director of participant services.

Nohe said his team is coming up with three new forms to help participants make use of the new flexibilities, including one that allows participants to change the amount and frequency of their annuity payments at any time. The agency is also doing away with a policy that suspends a participants’ contributions to their TSP accounts for six months if they take a hardship withdrawal.

“You can change your monthly installment payments currently only during [a fall open season period],” Nohe said. “But in the future, you can choose between monthly, quarterly and annual installment payments, and changes can be made to that at any time during the year.”

TSP officials said they plan not only to provide new flexibilities to participants, but make it easier to make use of those flexibilities. Nohe touted the fact that there will be four new “wizards” on the TSP website to help federal employees and retirees go through the various new processes.

“Right now, our wizards are just form fillers, but [next year], they will be more dynamic,” he said. “It can tell what’s in your account, and ask if you want to take [withdrawals] out of your Roth distribution or your traditional account. It’ll understand what you have so it can suggest what distribution you can take . . . It will take you from start to finish in your withdrawal.”

The first phase of implementation, focused on installment payment maintenance and removal of the withdrawal selection deadline, is slated to go into testing within the next two weeks, Nohe said. The public rollout of the new features is slated to occur on Sept. 15, although TSP officials will begin communicating with participants about the coming changes next February.

»To get the best federal retirement assistance and ideas about your benefits, request your free Federal Retirement Review.

TSP Funds Took a Nosedive in October

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Nearly all of the funds in the federal government’s 401(k)-style retirement savings program tumbled last month, mirroring a month of volatility in the financial markets.

The Thrift Savings Plan’s G Fund, which is made up of government securities, was the only portfolio in the black in October, gaining 0.26 percent. That brings its total 2018 earnings to 2.38 percent.

The S Fund, composed of small- and mid-size businesses, lost the most value last month, falling 10.06 percent. That brought the portfolio 0.30 percent into the negative since January. The international stocks of the I Fund fell 7.94 percent in October, bringing its 2018 losses to 8.92 percent.

The common stocks of the C Fund lost 6.84 percent last month, although the fund remains 2.98 percent in the black for 2018. And the fixed income (F) Fund fell 0.78 percent in October, bringing its losses so far this year to 2.26 percent.

All of the lifecycle (L) funds, which shift investments into more stable portfolios as participants get closer to retirement, lost value last month. The L Income Fund, for those who have already started withdrawing money, lost 1.40 percent; L 2020, 2.24 percent; L 2030, 4.60 percent; L 2040, 5.54 percent; and L 2050, 6.35 percent.

Since January, the L Income Fund has grown 1.52 percent; L 2020, 1.21 percent; and L 2030, 0.12 percent. The L 2040 Fund has fallen 0.35 percent this year, and the L 2050 is down 0.74 percent.

Get your Free Federal Retirement and TSP Review Today.  Sign up here.

Not The Best Day in the Markets Today

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Stocks sank today, Wednesday as a steep decline in tech shares and worries of rapidly rising rates sent Wall Street through its worst day in months.

The Dow closed 831 points lower as Intel and Microsoft fell more than 3.5 percent each. The Nasdaq plummeted more than 4 percent.

The S&P 500 dropped 3.3 percent, with the tech sector underperforming. The broad index also posted a five-day losing streak — its longest since November 2016 — and fell below its 50-day and 100-day moving averages, widely followed technical levels.

Both the Dow and S&P 500 posted their biggest one-day drops since early February, while the Nasdaq notched its largest single day sell-off since June 24, 2016.

Stocks have fallen sharply this month. For October, the S&P 500 and the Dow are down more than 4.4 percent and 3.3 percent, respectively. The Nasdaq has lost more than 7.5 percent.

Rising rate fears and a pivot out of technology stocks have made it a rough last few days. The Dow has dropped in four of the past five sessions, losing nearly 900 points over that span.

Why is this important?  Some are saying that the Bull run could be ending.  So should you keep your TSP in the Risky investments, or move it over to the G Fund.  Better yet, let us help explain

alternative to the Thrift Savings Plans.  We know it would put your mind at ease knowing you could still have safety of principal, but still with upside potential.  If that is something you would like

to learn more about, please request your Free Retirement Review today.

Could Your TSP Portfolio Withstand a Bear Market

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According to J.P. Morgan Asset Management, Guide to the Markets and Since March of 2009, the S&P 500 has gained over 300%.  Unfortunately, when long-run bull markets end, the decline can be dramatic.  In fact, the average bear market return is -45%.  Are you one of those that are still in the Risky Funds within your TSP? Can you afford for your $100,000 invested balance to become $55,000?  Better yet your $250,000 invested balance to become $137,500?

Plus, it can take a significant return to recover from the loss.  If today’s bull market turns bear, and you are nearing retirement, do you have time to make up for a large loss?

First, what is a bear market?  A bear market is defined as a 20% or more decline from the previous market high.  The bear return is the from the peak down to where it starts to return gains again.  You can lose thousands in just a short amount of time, but takes months or sometimes years to gain it back.

During your Federal Retirement Review with one of our Consultants, make sure you ask them how you can help Protect your Thrift Savings Plans, while still have a reasonable rate of return, and I’m sure you will be happy with what they tell you.

To Schedule your Personalized Federal Retirement Review – Contact us Today.

 

When Is The Best Time Of The Year To Take RMD’s

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One of the most common questions federal retirees over age 70.5 ask is: What is the best time of the year to take a required minimum distribution (RMD) from the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) and, if applicable, from a traditional IRA?

There is in reality no right or wrong answer to this question. The answer depends mainly on one’s financial and personal situation. This column presents some factors that traditional IRA owners and TSP participants over age 70 should consider when making the decision as to what time of the year to take their RMD.

Reason to take the RMD early in the year

RMDs must be taken by the end of the year for which they are being taken in order to be considered timely. For example, an 2018 RMD must be taken by Dec. 31, 2018 to be considered timely for the year 2018. The exception to this rule is for the first year an individual is required to take an RMD, the year in which the individual becomes age 70.5. In that case, the individual has until April 1  following the year the individual becomes age 70.5 to take his or her first RMD. For example, any individual born between July 1, 1947 and June 30, 1948 will become age 70.5 during calendar year 2018. That individual has until April 1, 2019 to take his or her first RMD for 2018. Another exception is for TSP participants who continue to work in federal service after they reach age 70. These TSP participants are not required to take their first TSP RMD until April 1 following the year  they retire from Federal service. But these TSP participants over age 70 are still required to take their traditional IRA RMDs and other qualified retirement plan (like 401(k) plans) they had previously participated in.

Although Dec. 31, 2018 is less than four months away, it is advisable for any individual having to take an RMD during calendar year 2018 to take the RMD now to avoid any potential error. It is not uncommon for people to hold off taking their traditional IRA RMD until later in the year, only to forget, become ill, or otherwise preoccupied, leading to a missed deadline. There are so many issues to worry about in retirement, but by taking the RMD early in the year, a 50 percent IRS penalty resulting from not taking the traditional IRA and qualified retirement plan RMD does not have to be one of them.

A retired TSP participant over age 70.5 need not worry about forgetting to take the TSP RMD by the end of the year. This is because the TSP Service Office will automatically send the TSP participant the TSP RMD in December if the TSP participant has not requested his or her TSP RMD by December.

Traditional IRA owners should not leave beneficiaries with a tight deadline

If a traditional IRA owner is subject to RMDs in 2018 and passes away before Dec. 31, 2018, then the individual’s beneficiaries are required to take the individual’s RMD before Dec. 31, 2018. In order to avoid a 50 percent IRS penalty, the beneficiaries must take the RMD before Dec. 31, 2018. The longer an individual waits to take his or her RMD and the later in the year the individual dies, the more difficult it becomes for the individual’s beneficiaries to take the RMD if the individual died before taking it.

After the RMD is taken, the remainder of the traditional IRA account can be converted or rolled over

RMDs are considered the first money to be distributed out of a traditional IRA owner’s account each year. Furthermore, a traditional IRA RMD is not eligible to be rolled over or converted to a Roth IRA . Putting those two rules together, before any rollover or Roth IRA conversion may be performed, an individual required to take a traditional IRA RMD must first take the RMD for the year. In other words, unless an individual over age 70.5 has already take his or her RMD for the year, the traditional IRA owner cannot make a Roth IRA conversion or complete a 60 day rollover.

Failure to take a traditional IRA RMD before completing a rollover or making a Roth IRA conversion often leads to serious tax issues. The RMD that was erroneously rolled over or converted is considered to be an “excess” contribution and subject to an IRS six percent excess contribution penalty each year until the rollover or conversion is corrected. By taking one’s RMD “sooner than later” before making a rollover or a Roth IRA conversion, one can eliminate this potential error and IRS penalty .

Reasons to wait until later in the year to take one’s RMD

When it comes to traditional IRAs and qualified retirement plans, tax deferral is one major benefit. The longer the money stays in a traditional IRA, the longer any earnings are shielded from taxes. That is why it is important to make contributions to a traditional IRA as early in the year as possible, and why it makes sense to delay taking RMDs until later in the year.

By waiting until the end of the year to take one’s RMD instead of early in the  year, one is earning additional tax deferral on earnings on the RMD. Any interest, dividends, capital gains, etc. that are earned on the RMD between now and the time the RMD is taken will occur inside the IRA. These earnings will not be subject to income tax unless distributed from the IRA in addition to the RMD. This may not seem very significant, but over time delaying one’s RMD until later in the year can have a beneficial impact on the size of one’s remaining traditional IRA and TSP retirement nest eggs.