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Retirement

What do You need to Know About Special Retirement Supplement?

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Do you know about the FERS supplement? An important retirement benefit plan for individuals who retire before the age of 62, it is also called the Special retirement supplement or SRS. Many individuals retiring before 62 are not aware of FERS benefits and thus couldn’t make a wise decision.

Special retirement supplement offers various benefits, such as it bridges the money gap if you retire before age 62 as you don’t receive social security until you reach age 62. But, not all federal employees are eligible for a special retirement supplement.

Who gets FERS special retirement benefits?

Federal workers younger than age 62 eligible for an unreduced federal employee retirement system are also eligible for temporary extra benefit, i.e., FERS annuity supplement. Firefighters, air traffic controllers, and law enforcement officers who retire under special provisions and FERS retirees who retire at age 60 with a minimum of 30 years of service are also eligible. If you are a firefighter planning your retirement, learn about FERS’s special supplement.

Rule for eligibility

1) If the employee has at least one calendar year of service at the time of retirement

2) Individuals retiring at or after reaching MRA with at least 30 years of service

3) individuals retiring at age 60 with at least 20 years of service

So, if you are eligible for FERS special retirement supplement, estimate it with the help of the below-mentioned formula.

 

 

How to estimate FERS special retirement supplement?

Get your annual social security statement handy to estimate your supplement amount. You also need to know how many years of creditable service you would have at the time of your retirement. Now, you can use the formula.

Years of creditable service/40 * your age 62 social security benefit = your estimated FERS supplement. Calculating FERS supplement benefits is an extremely time-consuming and complex task; take the help of a consultant from My Federal Retirement Help.

We are a team specialized in designing a comprehensive financial plan considering all aspects related to pre-retirement and retirement. We make integrated financial plans tailored to your specific goals and your family’s needs.

Reduction in FERS Supplement

FERS supplement is treated as social security income, so if you take the supplement before the full social security retirement age, your supplement can be subjected to taxes and reductions. Also, if you take a part-time job after retiring from federal service, your supplement may get reduced. Contact an expert to get more clarity on this.

My Federal Retirement Help is a team of planners and advisors who can help federal employees get into the next stage in their life by assisting them with a retirement plan, paperwork, and its submission to OPM.

TSP Preps for Its Transition to a New Service Provider

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Officials at the federal government’s 401(k)-style retirement savings program on Tuesday outlined the disruptions—and new features—participants will see as the Thrift Savings Plan transitions to a new recordkeeping service provider this weekend.

At the monthly meeting of the Federal Retirement Thrift Investment Board, which administers the TSP, project manager Tanner Nohe said the agency is on track to bring the public facing portions of the project, which was internally called Converge, online by June 1. Currently, most transactions are unavailable to participants, and there will be a full blackout period from the close of business on Thursday until the new system comes online.

Nohe said that while some aspects of TSP services will remain unchanged, like the tsp.gov web address and the phone number for the Thriftline customer service center, that’s where the similarities end. Beginning in June, TSP participants will have access to long awaited and requested features like a mobile app, a virtual agent to help users and answer questions.

Additionally, changes to the TSP website will enable participants to make loan repayments after they leave federal service, sign documents electronically, while participants who invested in the TSP both as members of the military and as civilian federal workers will be able to see their all of their account information from the same login, where before now they had to log into two separate tsp.gov accounts.

The TSP’s mobile app, which will be available on both Apple and Android operating systems, will feature most of the same functions as the desktop website, including the new virtual assistant, the ability to make distributions and withdrawals and change how funds are invested and make interfund transfers. And participants will be able to sign and submit forms electronically, as well as upload an image of a check to roll over funds from a traditional 401(k) into the TSP.

Additionally, the TSP is adjusting a number of its terms to track with the terminology used more commonly throughout the 401(k) industry.

Once the new services are live, participants will be required to create a new account on tsp.gov, which then will work on both the website and the mobile app. The new login process will be streamlined and feature greater security, Nohe said.

But Tee Ramos, the TSP’s director of participant services, warned there could be hiccups during the transition. The agency is expecting higher than normal call volume on the Thriftline, and has staffed up at its call center to accommodate those who need assistance.

“There will be some delays in the first week, and we’re doing everything we can to support participants,” he said. “But expect much higher call volume in the days before we go live, and know that we appreciate your patience.”

If anyone is needing assistance with making some changes within there TSP Accounts, or have considered other investment ideas with their Thrift Savings Plan, we do assist all Federal Employees in this area.  You can contact us for assistance or read some testimonials from other Federal employees we have helped as well.

Whole Life Insurance: What You Need to Know About It

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We all want to protect our loved ones from the uncertainties of life. So, we take a life insurance policy for our family. Many people go with While Life Insurance policies to take advantage of unique features, including consistent, level premiums for life, the ability to accumulate cash value, and living benefits. Do you also want to get the same for your loved ones? Read further to learn more.

Furthermore, some Whole Life Policies come under a special category. This means that you receive dividends through these policies, while getting cash value. Keep in mind that you get this benefit only, if you go through mutual life insurance companies. If you want to know more about it, look for a federal professional for federal employee retirement help.

If we talk more about mutual life insurance companies, stockholders or private equity companies don’t own them. Policyholders own these companies. Moreover, we are here to explore the main features of a Whole Life policy and make sure it is right for you.

health premiums

Permanent Coverage

Whole life insurance is nothing but permanent life insurance. It has some varying features compared to term life insurance. This insurance policy has been designed to protect you through your lifespan. Whether you die today after buying the policy or 50 years later, your loved ones will receive the benefits. After all, hire a consultant if you are planning your retirement and need any help with federal retirement.

Build Cash Value

While you take benefit of consistent premiums, your Whole Life insurance collects cash value for you in the form of dividends. Mutual life insurance companies help you make the most out of your policy. As a policy owner, you receive an equitable portion of the company’s surplus each year as a dividend. If you want federal employee retirement helphire a federal consultant. 

Consistent Premiums

Whole Life premiums work as per your age and will not vary throughout your life. In comparison with FEGLI, FEGLI will become greater in cost by over 650% by the time you retire. After all, many federal employees want to reduce their coverage to maintain the deduction at retirement. For this, it is good to have Whole Life insurance that compensates the risk with guaranteed premiums. To get help with federal retirementlook for a federal consultant near you.

Simplified Issue

As a federal professional, you can take advantage of this policy with simplified issue guidelines. This means that you will not need to undergo any health exams, bloodwork, or other requirements. That’s all.

USPS Converted 63,000 Non-Career Employees to Permanent Jobs Over the Last Year

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he U.S. Postal Service has converted 63,000 part-time or non-permanent workers into career positions, with leadership saying it has helped stabilize the workforce after years of escalating turnover.

USPS has struggled for years with high turnover rates—particularly within its non-career workforce—leading postal management to identify new strategies to keep them on as it aims to grow its rolls. The conversions have also helped the Postal Service address employee availability issues during the COVID-19 pandemic, the agency said in a report marking the one-year anniversary of the unveiling of Postmaster General Louis DeJoy’s 10-year business plan.

The Postal Service has since 2010 increasingly relied on non-career workers, such as postal support employees and mailhandler assistants, as a cheaper alternative to reduce labor costs as part of efforts to keep pace with shrinking mail revenue. Non-career employees generally receive a less generous benefits package and lower pay than their permanent, full-time counterparts. The agency’s non-career staff grew by more than 60% between 2010 and 2017. At least some of the conversions were promised as part of collective bargaining negotiations.

The USPS inspector general has for years highlighted the problems with the Postal Service’s growing reliance on non-career workers. It found in a 2016 report, for example, that turnover the agency’s unionized, career workforce turns over every year was 1.2%, while in 2014 the non-career workforce had a 29% quit rate. By 2016, the turnover rate for non-career employees had climbed to 43%.

DeJoy previously laid out plans to reduce turnover by focusing on better options for non-career employees, highlighting the issue in testimony to Congress and in his 10-year plan. The trend marks a departure from the first months of DeJoy’s tenure, when the postmaster general led an effort to slash tens of thousands of non-union jobs by offering early retirement incentives and layoffs. USPS has since gone on a hiring spree and DeJoy has speculated he may add up to 100,000 positions compared to when he took over to meet growing package demand.

The Postal Service ended 2021 with nearly 517,000 career employees, its highest total since 2012. The non-career workforce has remained fairly steady in recent years at 136,000.

USPS boasted that it has committed more than $6 billion in core infrastructure over the last year, part of DeJoy’s promise to invest at least $40 billion by 2031. About half of the obligated total has gone toward the Postal Service’s controversial contract for new delivery vehicles, only about 20% of which are so far electric. Other investments have included new processing equipment, improvements to post offices and technology upgrades.

Postal management also highlighted its improvements in delivering mail on time, though it is still falling well short of its goals. It has also slowed down delivery for about 40% of First-Class mail, making it easier to hit its targets. USPS promised more changes to “optimize” its network, saying those plans are still in the works.

“These efforts—impacting all aspects of our operations and infrastructure—are being refined now and will be deployed in stages this year and in the coming years,” the Postal Service said.

USPS also again noted its “judicious” use of its new authority to raise prices above inflation, though it just this week proposed hiking its rates for the second time by nearly the fully allowable amount. Through a complicated formula derived from factors including inflation, declining mail volume and retiree costs, USPS could have raised its First-Class mail rates in July by 6.507%. It chose to raise them by 6.506%. The Postal Service has generated nearly $2 billion in annualized revenue from previous increases, the agency said.

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Consider these Things if you want to retire within 5 Years

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If you want to retire from your federal government job within five years, you should know some important things. After all, you should make sure everything is right for a great exist from your federal career.

In this article, we have included four things that you should do to retire within five years of your job. You can also contact a federal consultant to plan your federal retirement to gain the most out of it.

Remember to keep your insurance into retirement

It is always helpful to keep the insurance in your retirement, but not all are able to do so. You need to follow essential rules to keep the insurance into retirement. Eligibility for FEHB is:

• You need to enrol in FEHB for a minimum of five years before retirement.
• You should be covered under FEHB when retiring.

While FEHB has rules to keep it into retirement, FEGLI has certain rules. You need to follow all these rules to carry your insurance to your retirement. To understand the rules in detail, call a federal consultant. They will also help you with FERS special supplements.

Consider your retirement income and expenses 

If you are a federal employee, you should know that you have three primary income sources: FERS pension, social security, and your TSP. If you don’t know how these incomes sources work, hire a federal consultant. They will explain each technical point and help you plan your federal retirement.

medicare-supplement

Know the decision you make at retirement 

Mainly, three big decisions you usually make at your retirement include survivor benefit, life insurance, and TSP. The survivor benefit is when you have to offer your spouse a piece of your pension. Life insurance helps you take care of all your medical expenses. After your retirement, you have to decide how you will use your TSP funds or how you will invest them. Learn more about these three terms with a federal consultant. They will help you plan your retirement in the right way.

Choose a retirement date

The last important thing to decide to retire within five years of federal service is to choose a specific day. Choosing a date to retire makes a big difference in how you receive your pension. If you don’t know anything about planning your retirement within five years of your job, hire a federal consultant. They will help you in everything from planning to knowing about FERS special supplement. That’s all.

Know About Switching From Federal Service to Private Sector

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Are you thinking of switching from your federal career to the private sector? Before you switch, you need to learn some important things about it. After all, if you have made your decision, then stay with this blog to learn more.

You are not alone if you want a transition in your federal service. Many people like you want to work in the private sector by switching from their federal life. After all, you may think of doing so to make more money with less hassle. But keep in mind that it is not easy to make a transition in your federal career. You may not get some benefits such as civil service retirement benefits for federal employees in a private-sector job.

Moreover, your private sector employment will come with some benefits as well as some downsides. Keep reading this post to know the reasons for switching from a federal job to the private sector.

medicare-supplementSalary

One of the reasons you think of changing your federal career is salary. You may have an offer from the private sector with a higher salary, and so you want to make a switch. But you should know that retired federal employees gain huge retirement and social security benefits you may not get in the private sector. After all, you can consult a federal professional before leaving your federal job. A professional will help you with the federal government pension plan calculator and other tools.

Health insurance

Health insurance is one of the great benefits you get as a federal employee. And due to this, many people don’t want to leave the federal government. You know that health costs are rising day by day, so it is crucial to have an affordable health plan for you and your family.

Further, many contracting companies offer more affordable health insurance than federal employees. This is the reason why people want to switch. But you should not underestimate the civil service retirement benefits for federal employees. You may not get it in a private job.

Life insurance

FEGLI is the best health insurance program that allows federal employees to take advantage of insurance regardless of health issues. You may not get this benefit in the private sector. On the other hand, if you have good health, you may get cheaper options in the private sector.

Pension

As a federal employee, you know that you get a pension on your retirement, which is a huge perk. While many contracting companies offer a similar plan to the TSP, only a few will have a pension plan. For these civil service retirement benefits for federal employees, many people don’t want to switch. That’s all.

Do You Know These Facts About Federal Retirement?

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You go through several facts in your daily life. Some of them are interesting but don’t make any difference in your life whether or not you know them. After all, when it comes to federal retirement, federal employees should know these facts about federal retirement. These facts may be a subject of discussion for many on weekends. 

Moreover, below we have included some fun facts about federal retirement you will want to know. If you are worried about federal government retirement benefits and pension plans, these facts may be beneficial for you. 

federal retirement planning - fers benefits -retirement support services - tsp payment schedule 2018

The federal retirement system is about 100 years old

Do you know the federal retirement system is almost 100 years old? The single mandatory retirement age of 70 was created in 1920 under an act. In the beginning, retirement was not permitted except for disability. But in 1922, a retroactive provision came into force enabling discontinued service retirement at age 55 with 15 years of service. If we talk about the basic annuity, it was 60% of the final 10-year average salary. Moreover, if you are not clear about civil service retirement benefits for federal employeesyou can consult professionals in your area. 

Withdraws from conventional TSP accounts are taxed as ordinary income.

Conventional TSP withdrawals are a part of your other income that is taxed with ordinary federal rates. In addition to it, you need to keep yourself aware of the 10% tax penalty if you make any early withdrawals due to resigning or taking an early retirement before age 55. After all, to know more about federal government retirement benefits and pension plans, you can consult a professional federal retirement planner in your area. 

People are working longer.

As of 2014, the total workforce, including men and women, was 23% and 15%, respectively. The age of male and female individuals was 65 and older. The total workforce is supposed to increase in the upcoming years. If we talk about the study of the Census Bureau, the nation’s 90 and older population has almost tripled over the previous four decades. After all, federal employees should keep themselves aware of the advantages of lifetime pensions and health insurance. To know more about civil service retirement benefits for federal employeesyou can call a professional federal retirement planner in your area. That’s all. These are some facts about federal retirement you need to know. 

Federal Employee Retirement Planning Checklist

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If you want to retire at the time you have always planned to, and with a sufficient pension amount so that you can live the rest of your retirement life comfortably, the last five to ten years of your service are crucial. You can also take a financial advisor’s help to calculate the FERS benefits, understand how to boost up the perks, and what would be the perfect age for your retirement. 

When you contact a FERS advisor, they will use the federal government pension plan calculator to calculate the benefits that you may receive. Meanwhile, they will also offer you a federal employee retirement planning checklist that will assist you in planning a comfortable retirement. The checklist contains numerous factors.   

retirement planning 

The accuracy of SF 50 form

It is one of the important factors of the federal employee retirement planning checklistYou should ensure that all the details in your form are correct, especially box 30 and box 31 for retirement plan and service computation date, respectively. Box 30 is for the retirement plan you are covered under, and box 31 determines annual leave for full-time employees. 

 

Federal Employee Health Benefit (FEHB) coverage

Suppose you are enrolled under FEHB insurance through yourself or through a spouse who is also a federal employee and if you want to retain the benefit of FEHB through your retirement years. In that case, you must ensure that you have the FEHB coverage for at least five years on the day of your retirement. 

Thrift Saving Plan Contributions 

Use a federal government pension plan calculator to calculate how much you must contribute to the thrift saving plan. If you want to have a good amount in your thrift saving, you must also contribute the maximum amount to TSP. Unless you want to withdraw the amount as soon as you retire, you should allow for its long-term growth. 

Examine social security benefits

It is another factor of the federal employee retirement planning checklistThe social security benefit would be paid to the individual in the case of death, disability, or retirement. You must ensure that your earning history is mentioned correctly. 

These are some of the important checklists of the federal employee retirement plan. However, one of the mistakes an employee can make is not updating his estate plan. The important estate plan includes beneficiaries’ details, a living will, and establishing a trust to cover inheritance taxes. 

How to Deal With OPM’s Delay in Retirement Application Processing

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Many federal employees have realized that upon retiring from federal service,  the amount of time from the day of retirement to the newly retired employee receiving his or her first full  CSRS or FERS annuity check may be in the range of three to eight months.

While the newly retired employee will receive (for a period of two months to as much as 10 months )“interim” annuity checks (which are a percentage of what the full annuity check they are entitled to), for many new retirees this could turn into a cash flow problem during the interim annuity payment period.

This column discusses some of the problems causing the delays in OPM’s sending the first full annuity payment to annuitants and what employees who will be retiring in the next few years should do in anticipation of a possible cash flow problem during the early months of their retirement.

The Office of Personnel Management (OPM)’s retirement office processing center in Boyers, PA is responsible for processing retirement applications. OPM is well aware of the increasing processing delays in retirement applications. The problem is nothing new . It has gone on for many years but has gotten worse in recent years due to the increasing number of retiring employees.  The OPM retirement department keeps a monthly tab on retirement application processing and delays and publishes the monthly data.

How To Expedite Your Retirement Application

Some retirement applications are processed (that is to say, adjudicated) faster than others. This means that some annuitants receive their first full annuity checks sooner than other annuitants. Included with the first full annuity check will be retroactive payments owed on the previous partial annuity payments. According to OPM, the one thing that retiring federal employees can do to expedite the time for OPM’s retirement office to process retirement applications is for employees to make sure that the portion of the retirement application they are responsible for is fully complete. Complete applications include providing all necessary forms besides the application form itself.

The following is a list of the necessary forms and documents to be submitted in order to fully adjudicate a CSRS or FERS retirement application:

1.   Application for immediate federal retirement:  For CSRS/CSRS Offset employees – Form SF 2801; for FERS/ “Trans” FERS employees – Form SF 3107;

2.   The notarized consent of a spouse if the spouse has agreed to less than a maximum  survivor annuity benefit;

3.   In case a retiring employee has been divorced and a former spouse was awarded a portion of the employee’s CSRS or FERS annuity, a certified copy of the divorce decree or court order;

4.   Documentation of five years of coverage (in particular; the last five years) under the Federal Employees Health Benefits (FEHB) program in order to maintain health insurance coverage throughout retirement;

5.   Documentation of five years of coverage during at least the last five years of service, under the Federal Employees Group Life Insurance (FEGLI) program;

6.   FEGLI life insurance election form for maintaining FEGLI coverage during retirement –  SF 2818;

7.   Documentation of creditable civilian service that provides evidence of an employee’s Federal service;

8.   Documentation of military service, if any;

9.   Updated beneficiary designation forms including for CSRS, Form SF 2808; for FERS, Form SF 3102; and for FEGLI, Form SF2823.  The other major beneficiary form for the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP), form TSP-3 should already be on file with the TSP Service Office; and

10.   Voluntary contribution election for CSRS employees who have established a Voluntary Contributions Program (VCP) account.

3 Primary Reasons Federal Retirement Applications Are Delayed

OPM cites three main reasons for delay in processing retirement applications, namely:

  1.  A retirement package is incomplete – for example, important documentation is missing or documents are lacking a signature;
  2.  A retirement application contains elements that create additional processing requirements such as a court order or a FERS annuity supplement; and
  3.  The applicant has to make multiple decisions such as whether to pay a deposit for temporary (non-deposit) federal service or prior military service; to make a redeposit for withdrawn CSRS or FERS contributions; or to make voluntary contributions to the CSRS Retirement and Disability Fund under the Voluntary Contribution Program.

Also, it is important to keep in mind that OPM’s retirement processing  unit tries to process applications in the order in which the applications arrive. But retirement application processing can take longer in the case of retirement applications accompanied by a court order to pay benefits to a former spouse.

Given the reality of the situation and accepting the fact that OPM’s retirement office processing center will be facing a retirement application backlog for most probably a very long time as more and more employees retire, what should employees who intend to retire within the next five to 10 years do in order to solve their possible cash flow problem while waiting for their first full CSRS or FERS annuity check? The following are some suggestions of what retiring employees can do — and what they should not do.

5 Things Retiring Federal Employees Can Do

1. Build up unused annual leave.

When an employee retires from federal service, any unused annual leave will be paid to the retiring employee in a lump sum payment. This lump sum payment – fully subject to income and payroll taxes – is paid by the retiring employee’s payroll office within a few weeks after the employee retires. Some employees can get get paid for as much as six weeks of unused annual leave and can use this payment to help pay their bills while waiting for their first full annuity check.

2.  Seek employment, at least on a temporary basis.

After retiring from federal service, many employees seek employment in the private sector, at least for a few years. In so doing, they can earn as much as the want without affecting their CSRS or FERS annuities. The only pension income that could be affected by salary or self-employment income is the FERS annuity supplement which is subject to an earnings test. FERS annuitants who retire before age 62 and are eligible for the FERS annuity supplement should be aware that the annuity supplement is not paid during the “interim” annuity period. This means that a FERS annuitant’s working during the “interim” annuity period, and for that matter during the annuitant’s first year of retirement, will not affect  the FERS annuity supplement.

3.  Start Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) withdrawals.

A retiring employee can start withdrawing from his or her TSP account following at least 30 days following his or her retirement date. With the new and more flexible TSP withdrawal rules perhaps starting later this year, annuitants will have more flexibility in withdrawing from their TSP accounts. Annuitants should be aware that since the TSP has to last as much 30 to 40 years of retirement, annuitants should  be somewhat conservative in the amount of withdrawals from their TSP accounts during the early years of their retirement. Penalty-free traditional TSP withdrawals can be made if the employee retires from Federal service sometime during the year after the year the employee becomes age 55.

4.  Start receiving monthly Social Security retirement benefit as early as age 62.

Federal retirees should be careful about starting to receive their monthly Social Security retirement benefit at age 62 since starting one’s Social Security before full retirement age (ages 65 to 67, depending which year an individual was born) will result in a permanent reduction to one’s Social Security retirement benefit. Drawing Social Security before one’s FRA and working could also reduce or eliminate one’s monthly benefit due to the Social Security earnings test. A married or formerly married individual may be eligible to receive half of a spouse’s or ex-spouse’s Social Security benefits (“spousal” or “ex-spousal” benefit) or all of a deceased spouse’s or a deceased ex-spouse’s Social Security benefit (“widow /”widower” benefit).

5.  Increase one’s financial liquidity, perhaps to as much as one year’s worth of one’s average monthly expenses.

Financial advisors generally recommend that all individuals – whether working or retired – should always own a certain amount of liquid assets. Liquid assets include a passbook savings account or a money market account. These liquid assets should ideally be equal to at least three to six months of their average monthly expenses. Retiring employees therefore should have at least six months to a year’s worth of their average monthly  expenses invested in liquid assets. These liquid asset funds will be used to help pay their monthly expenses during the “interim” annuity period.

What Retiring Federal Employees Should Not Do

Taking out short-term loans such as home equity loans is not a good idea and highly not recommended. Adding more debt to one’s retirement years  when there is generally less income is not a good move. Employees and annuitants should also be aware that under the Tax Cuts and Jobs Acts of 2017 taking effect  Jan. 1, 2018, all home equity loan interest is nondeductible if the loan proceeds are not used to improve one’s home. This means that the interest on home equity loans used to pay personal expenses is nondeductible on one’s income taxes.

Shortly before retiring, a retiring employee could take out a general purpose TSP loan. However, the loan must be paid back within 90 days following the employee’s retirement date. If the loan is not paid back in full within those 90 days, then the unpaid balance will be considered a taxable distribution – subject to federal and state income tax – for that year. If the annuitant  is under age 59.5, then the taxable distribution is subject to a 10 percent early withdrawal penalty.

medicare-supplement

Federal Special Retirement – Know about Best Medicare Supplements Plan

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Federal special retirement supplement has many things to cover. Most importantly, medicare supplement plans formulated to give exclusive benefits to the FERS employees who are very close to the retirement age. Every senior citizen needs special medicare benefits. Federal employees have exclusive rights to avail the benefits while signing off from the services after completing stipulated years of a required job as per FERS special retirement supplement criteria.

Know-How Medicare is Associated with FERS Supplement Plan

Medicare is associated with FERS special retirement supplement. FYI, Medicare is the natural health insurance for which federal employees are eligible once they reach 65. There are various parts of federal medical supplement plans as Part A makes patients eligible for treatment in hospital, skilled nursing facility as well as domicile health and hospice care, Part B pays doctor fees and medical bills, Outpatient hospital care as well as for various other medical facilities availed that are not covered under part A. Other than this, the program involving other medical care choices is Part C.

Federal employees enrolled in FERS special retirement supplement pay some portion of the amount from their salary and become eligible for federal medicare supplement plans that are called Medigap

 Know About the Medicare Eligibility

If you’ve enrolled in FERS special retirement, then the only thing that matters is whether you are eligible to avail of any federal medicare supplement plans. There’s no question of eligibility if you or your spouse are federal employees and have worked for at least ten years in Medicare-covered employment. Other than this, it would help if you were 65 years old and a permanent resident of the United States. In case you’re younger and have any disability or kidney disease, then you’re the exception to the rule and found eligible to avail any of the federal medicare supplements plans.

 How to Avail Part A without Paying Premium at 65 Years Age

Being a federal employee, you can avail part A of federal medicare supplement plans being enrolled for FERS special retirement supplement

  • Already subscribed for receiving retirement benefits from social security or railroad retirement board
  • Already received railroad retirement benefits but have not filed for them
  • Either you or your spouse is covered under any of the federal medicare supplement plans

Even if you’re under 65 years of age,  there’s no hassle in availing federal medicare supplement plan if:

  • You are eligible to receive social security benefits or railroad retirement board disability benefits for 24 months
  • You are a kidney transplant patient or in dialysis

Though you are eligible for a federal medicare supplement plan without paying any premium for part A, you need to pay for part B as its monthly premium is $148.50 for most enrollees. The high-income retires need to pay the surcharge, which is phased as per pay level. No matter you’re in FERS special retirement program, it’s essential you need to pay for part B in case of getting an exception in part A due to one or the other reason